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Bombast

literally means the produce of the bombyx (Middle Latin bombax, Greek bombux), and applied to cotton-wool used for padding. The head of the cotton plant was called “bombast” or “bombace” in the sixteenth century. Bombast was much used in the reign of Henry VIII. for padding, and hence inflated language was so called.

We have received your letters full of love, …

And in our maiden council rated them …

As bombast and as lining to the time.”


Shakespeare: Love’s Labour’s Lost, v. 2.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Bolt
Bolt from the Blue (A)
Bolt in Tun
Bolt Upright
Bolted
Bolted Arrow
Bolton
Bolus
Bomb
Bomba
Bombast
Bombastes Furioso
Bombastus
Bon Gaultier Ballās
Bon gré mal gré
Bon Mot (French)
Bon Ton (French)
Bon Vivant (French)
Bona Fide
Bona-roba
Bonduca = Boadicea