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Chestnut

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A stale joke. In The Broken Sword, an old melodrama by William Dillon, Captain Xavier is for ever telling the same jokes with variations. He was telling about one of his exploits connected with a cork-tree, when Pablo corrects him, “A chestnut-tree you mean, captain.” “Bah ! (replied the captain) I say a cork-tree.” “A chestnut-tree,” insists Pablo. “I must know better than you (said the captain); it was a cork-tree, I say.” “A chestnut (persisted Pablo). I have heard you tell the joke twenty-seven times, and I am sure it was a chestnut.”

“Is not this an illustration of the enduring vitality of the ‘chestnutʹ? [joke].”—Notes and Queries.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Chequers
Cheronean [ch = k]
Cherry
Cherry Fairs
Cherry Trees and the Cuckoo
Cherubims
Chery and Fair-Star
Cheshire
Chess
Chesterfield
Chestnut
Chestnut Sunday
Cheval (French, à cheval)
Cheval de Bataille (His)
Chevalier dIndustrie
Chevalier du Brouillard (Le)
Chevaux de Frise (French)
Cheveril
Chevy Chase
Chiabreresco (Italian)
Chiar-oscuro [pronounce ke-ar-ros-ku-ro]