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Conclamaʹtio

,

amongst the ancient Romans, was similar to the Irish howl over the dead; and, as in Ireland, women led the funeral cortège, weeping ostentatiously and gesticulating. “One not howled over” (corpus nondum conclamaʹtum) meant one at the point of death; and “one howled for” was one given up for dead or really deceased. Virgil tells us that the ululation was a Phœnician custom; and therefore he makes the palace ring with howls when Dido burnt herself to death.

“Lamentis, gemituque, et fœmineo ululato,

Texta fremunt.”


Æneid, iv. 687.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Con Amore (Italian)
Con Commodo (Italian)
Con Spirito (Italian)
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Concert Pitch
Concerto (Italian)
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Confusion Worse Confounded