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Crocʹodile (3 syl.)

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A symbol of deity among the Egyptians, because it is the only aquatic animal, says Plutarch, which has its eyes covered with a thin transparent membrane, by reason of which it sees and is not seen; so God sees all, Himself not being seen. To this he subsequently adds another reason, saying, “The Egyptians worship God symbolically in the crocodile, that being the only animal without a tongue, like the Divine Logos, which standeth not in need of speech.” (De Iside et Osiride, vol. ii. p. 381.)

Achilles Tatius says, “The number of its teeth equals the number of days in a year.” Another tradition is, that during the seven days held sacred to Apis, the crocodile will harm no one.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Cripplegate
Criss-cross Row (Christ-cross row)
Crishna
Crisis
Crispin
Criterion
Critic
Croaker
Croakumshire
Croc mitaine (A)
Crocodile
Crocodile (King)
Crocodile’s Eye
Crocodile’s Tears
Crocum in Ciliciam ferre
Crœsus
Cromeruach
Cromlech
Cromwell
Crone
Cronian Sea

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