- skip - Brewer’s

Cum Hoc, Propter Hoc

.

Because two or more events occur consecutively or simultaneously, one is not necessarily the outcome of the other. Sequence of events is not always the result of cause and effect. The swallows come to England in the spring, but do not bring the spring.

“[Free trade and revival of trade] says Lord Penzance, came simultaneously, but, he adds, ‘There is no more dangerous form of reasoning than the cum hoc, propter hoc,ʹ”—Neneteenth Century, April, 1886.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Cul de Sac (French)
Culdees
Cullis
Cully
Culminate
Culross Girdles
Culver
Culverin
Culverkeys
Cum Grano Salis
Cum Hoc, Propter Hoc
Cumberland Poet (The)
Cummer
Cunctator [the delayer]
Cuneiform Letters
Cunning Man or Woman
Cuno
Cunobelin’s Gold Mines
Cunstance
Cuntur
Cup