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Foil

.

That which sets off something to advantage. The allusion is to the metallic leaf used by jewellers to set off precious stones. (French, feuille; Latin, folium; Greek, phullon, a leaf.)

Hector, as a foil to set him off.”


Broome.


“Iʹll be your foil, Laertes. In mine ignorance

Your skill shall, like a star iʹ the darkest night,

Stick flery off indeed.”


He foiled me. He outwitted me.


“If I be foiled, there is but one ashamod who never was gracious.”—Shakespeare: As You Like It, i. 2.

To run a foil. To puzzle; to lead astray. The track of game is called its foil; and an animal hunted will sometimes run back over the same foil in order to mislead its pursuers.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Fly in the Face of Providence (To)
Fly Open (To)
Fly Out at (To)
Flying Colours (To come off with)
Flying Dutchman
Flying without Wings (No)
Flyman’s Plot (The)
Fog-eater
Fogie or Fogey
Fo-hi or Foë
Foil
Folio
Folk
Folk
Folk-lore
Folk-mote [a folk meeting]
Follets
Follow
Follower
Folly
Fond