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Folk

.

Fairies, also calledpeople,” “neighbours,” “wights.” The Germans have their kleine volk (little folk), the Swiss their hill people and earth people.

“The little folk,

So happy and so gay, amuse themselves

Sometimes with singing …

Sometimes with dancing, when they jump and spring

Like the young skipping kids in the Alp-grass.”


Wyss: Idyll of Gertrude and Rosy.


“In the hinder end of harvest, at All-hallow e en,

When our good neighbours ride, if I read right,

Some buckled on beenwand, and some on a been.”


Montgomery: Flyting against Polwart.


“I crouchë thee from the elvës, and from wights.”


Chaucer: The Millere’s Tale.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Flying Colours (To come off with)
Flying Dutchman
Flying without Wings (No)
Flyman’s Plot (The)
Fog-eater
Fogie or Fogey
Fo-hi or Foë
Foil
Folio
Folk
Folk
Folk-lore
Folk-mote [a folk meeting]
Follets
Follow
Follower
Folly
Fond
Fons et Origo (Latin)
Font
Fontarabia