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Garrotʹe or Garotte (2 syl., g hard)

is the Spanish garrote (a stick). The original way of garrotting in Spain was to place the victim on a chair with a cord round his neck, then to twist the cord with a stick till strangulation ensued. In 1851 General Lopez was garrotted by the Spanish authorities for attempting to gain possession of Cuba; since which time the thieves of London, etc., have adopted the method of strangling their victim by throwing their arms round his throat, while an accomplice rifles his pockets.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Gargantua (g hard)
Gargantuan
Gargittios
Gargouille, or Gargoil (g hard)
Garibaldi’s Red Shirt
Garland (g hard)
Garlick
Garnish (g hard)
Garratt (g hard)
Garraway’s
Garrote or Garotte
Garter (g hard)
Garvies
Gasconade
Gaston (g hard)
Gastrolators
Gat-tooth (g hard)
Gate Money
Gate-posts
Gate of Italy
Gate of Tears [Babelmandeb]