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Golʹgotha

signifies a skull, and corresponds to the French word chaumont. Probably it designated a bare hill or rising ground, having some fanciful resemblance to the form of a bald skull.

“Golgotha seems not entirely unconnected with the hill of Gareb, and the locality of Goath, mentioned in Jeremiah xxxi. 39, on the north-west of the city. I am inclined to fix the place where Jesus was crucified … on the mounds which command the valley of Hinnom, above Birket-Mamila.”—Renan: Life of Jesus, chap. xxv.

Golgotha, at the University church, Cambridge, was the gallery in which the “heads of the houses” sat; so called because it was the place of skulls or heads. It has been more wittily than truly said that Golgotha was the place of empty skulls.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Golden Shower
Golden Slipper (The)
Golden State
Golden Stream
Golden Thigh
Golden Tooth
Golden Town (The)
Golden Valley (The)
Golden Verses
Goldy
Golgotha
Goliath
Golosh
Gomarists
Gombeen Man (The)
Gombo
Gondola
Gone Coon (A)
Gone to the Devil
Gone Up
Goneril