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Harefoot

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Swift of foot as a hare. The surname given to Harold I., youngest son of Canute (1035–1040).

To kiss the hare’s foot. To be too late for anything, to be a day after the fair. The hare has gone by, and left its footprint for you to salute. A similar phrase is To kiss the post.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hard By
Hard Lines
Hard Up
Hard as Nails
Hard as a Stone
Hard as the Nether Millstone
Hardouin
Hardy (Letitia)
Hare
Hare-brained, or Hair-brained
Harefoot
Hare-lip
Hare-stone = Hour-stone
Hare and the Tortoise (The)
Hares shift their Sex
Haricot Mutton
Harĭkĭrĭ. [Happy despatch.]
Hark Back (To)
Harlequin
Harlot
Harlowe (Clarissa)