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Horatian Metre (An)

.

Book i. Ode iv. In alternate lines, one of seventeen syllables and the other of eleven, thus:

1

Below is a translation of the first four lines in this Horatian metre (rhyming):

Now that the winter is past, blithe spring to the balmy fields inviteth,

And lo! from the dry sands men their keels are hauling;

Cattle no longer their stalls affect, nor the hind his hearth delighteth,

Nor deadly Frost spreads over meads her palling.


E. C. B.

See Alcaic, Asclepiadic, Choriambic, Sapphic, etc. (See also Hexameters, and Hexameters and Pentameters.)

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hop
Hop-o-my-Thumb
Hope
Hopeful
Hope-on-High Bomby
Hopkins (Matthew)
Hopkinsians
Hopping Giles
Hopton
Horace
Horatian Metre (An)
Horatio
Horn
Horn, Horns
Horn-book
Horn-gate
Horn of Fidelity
Horn of Plenty [Cornu-copia]
Horn of Power
Horn of the Son of Oil (The) (Isa. v. 1)
Horn with Horn or Horn under Horn