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Horn-gate

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One of the two gates of “Dreams;” the other is of ivory. Visions which issue from the former come true. This whim depends upon two Greek puns; the Greek for horn is keras, and the verb krano or karanoo means “to bring to an issue,” “to fulfil; so again elephas is ivory, and the verb elephairo means “to cheat,” “to deceive.” The verb kraino, however, is derived from kra, “the head,” and means “to bring to a head;” and the verb elephairo is akin to elăchus, “small.”

Anchiʹses dismisses Æneʹas through the ivory gate, on quitting the infernal regions, to indicate the unreality of his vision.

“Sunt geminæ somni portæ, quarum altera fertur

Cornea, qua veris facilis datur exĭtus umbris;

Altera candenti perfecta nitens elephanto;

Sed falsa ad cœlum mittunt insomnia Manës.”


Virgil: Æneid, vi. 894, etc.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hopkins (Matthew)
Hopkinsians
Hopping Giles
Hopton
Horace
Horatian Metre (An)
Horatio
Horn
Horn, Horns
Horn-book
Horn-gate
Horn of Fidelity
Horn of Plenty [Cornu-copia]
Horn of Power
Horn of the Son of Oil (The) (Isa. v. 1)
Horn with Horn or Horn under Horn
Horns of a Dilemma
Horns of Moses Face
Horns of the Altar (To the)
Horne
Horner

See Also:

Horn Gate