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Hosʹpitallers

.

First applied to those whose duty it was to provide hospitĭum (lodging and entertainment) for pilgrims. The most noted institution of the kind was at Jerusalem, which gave its name to an order called the Knights Hospitallers. This order was first called that of the Knights of St. John at Jerusalem, which still exists; afterwards they were styled the Knights of Rhodes, and then Knights of Malta, because Rhodes and Malta were conferred on them by different monarchs.

“The first crusade … led to the establishment of the Christian kingdom of Jerusalem, in 1099. The chief strength of the kingdom lay in the two orders of military monks—the Templars and the Hospitallers or Knights of St. John”—Freeman: General Sketch, chap. xi.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Horse-vetch
Horse and his Rider
Horse-shoes and Nails (for rent)
Horsemen
Horsey Man (A)
Hortus Siccus
Horus
Hose
Hospital
Hospital (The)
Hospitallers
Host
Hostage
Hostler
Hot
Hot Cockles
Hot Cross Buns
Hot-foot
Hot Water (In)
Hotch-pot
Hotch-potch

See Also:

Hospitallers