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Idealism

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The doctrines taught by Idealists.

Subjective idealism, taught by Fechte (2 syl.), supposes the object (say a tree) and the image of it on the mind is all one. Or rather, that there is no object outside the mental idea.

Objective idealism, taught by Schelling, supposes that the tree and the image thereof on the mind are distinct from each other.

Absolute idealism, taught by Hegel, supposes there is no such thing as phenomena; that mind, through the senses, creates its own world. In fact, that there is no real, but all is mere ideal.

These are three German philosophers:

Hegel (1770–1831).

Schelling (1770–1854).

Fechte (1762–1814).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ice Saints or Frost Saints
Iceberg
Iceland Dogs
Ich Dien
Ichneumon
Ichor (I-kor)
Ichthus
Icon Basilike
Iconoclasts (Greek, “image breakers”)
Idæan Mother
Idealism
Idealists
Ides
Idiom
Idiosyncrasy
Idiot
Idle Lake
Idle Wheel
Idle Worms
Idleness
Idol Shepherd (The)

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Idealism