- skip - Brewer’s

Merrie England

may probably mean “illustrious,” from the old Teutonic mer. (Anglo-Saxon, mara, famous.) According to R. Ferguson, the word appears in the names Marry, Merry, Merick; the French Méra, Merick; Merey, Mériq; and numerous others (Teutonic Name-System, p. 368.) (See below Merry.)

1

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Merian (French)
Merlin
Merlin Chair (A)
Merlo or Melo (Juan de)
Mermaids
Mermaid’s Glove [Chalina oculata]
Mermaids Purses
Meropē
Merops Son or A son of Merops
Merovingian Dynasty
Merrie England
Merrow
Merry
Merry Andrew
Merry Dancers
Merry Dun of Dover
Merry Men (My)
Merry Men of Mey
Merry Monarch
Merry-thought
Merry as a Cricket, or as a Lark, or as a Grig