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Mulreadʹy Envelope (The, 1840)

,

is an envelope resembling a half-sheet of letter-paper, when folded. The space left for the address formed the centre of an ornamental design by Mulready, the artist. When the penny postage envelopes were first introduced, these were the stamped envelopes of the day, which, however, remained in circulation only one year, and were more fit for a comic annual than anything else.

“A set of those odd-looking envelope-things,

Where Britannia (who seems to be crucified flings

To her right and her left, funny people with wings

Amongst elephants, Quakers, and Catabaw kings,—

And a taper and wax, and small Queen’s-heads in packs,

Which, when notes are too big you must stick on their backs.”


Ingoldsby: Legends.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Muggletonian
Mugwump (A)
Mugwump Press (The)
Mulatto (Spanish)
Mulberry
Mulciber—i.e
Mule
Mull
Mulla
Mulmutine Laws
Mulready Envelope (The, 1840)
Multipliers
Multitudes
Multum in Parvo (Latin)
Mum
Mumbo Jumbo
Mumchance
Mummy
Mummy Wheat
Mumpers
Mumping Day