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Phœnix

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Said to live a certain number of years, when it makes in Arabia a nest of spices, sings a melodious dirge, flaps his wings to set fire to the pile, burns itself to ashes, and comes forth with new life, to repeat the former one. (See PhŒnix Period.)

“The enchanted pile of that lonely bird,

Who sings at the last his own death-lay,

And in music and perfume dies away.”


Thomas Moore: Paradise and the Peri.

Phœnix, as a sign over chemistsʹ shops, was adopted from the association of this fabulous bird with alchemy. Paracelsus wrote about it, and several of the alchemists employed it to symbolise their vocation.

A phœnix among women. A phœnix of his kind. A paragon, unique; because there was but one phœnix at a time.


“If she be furnished with a mind so rare,

She is alone the Arabian bird.”


The Spanish Phœnix. Lope de Vega is so called by G. H. Lewes.


“Insigne poeta, a cuyo verso o prosa

Ninguno le aventaja ni aun Mega.”

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Phineus
Phiz
Phiz
Phlegethon
Phlegra
Phlogiston
Phocensian Despair
Phocion
Phœbē
Phœbus
Phœnix
Phœnix Alley (London)
Phœnix Park (Dublin)
Phœnix Period
Phœnix Theatre
Phœnix Tree
Phooka or Pooka
Phorcos
Phormio
Phrygians
Phryne

See Also:

Phœnix