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Pickers and Stealers

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The hands. In French argot hands are called harpes, which is a contracted form of harpions; and harpion is the Italian arpione, a hook used by thieves to pick linen, etc., from hedges. A harpe dʹun ohien means a dog’s paw, and “Il mania très bien ses harpes” means he used his fingers very dexterously.

Rosencrantz. My lord, you once did love me. Hamlet. And do still, by these pickers and stealers.”—Shakespeare: Hamlet, iii. 3.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Picards
Picaroon
Picatrix
Piccadilly (London)
Piccinists (1774–1780)
Pick
Pick Straws (To)
Pick a Hole in his Coat (To)
Pickaninny
Pickelherringe
Pickers and Stealers
Pickle
Pickwick (Mr. Samuel)
Pickwickian
Picrochole
Picts
Picts Houses
Picture
Picture Bible
Picture Galleries
Pictures