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Quadrilʹle (2 syl., French)

means a small square; a dance in which the persons place themselves in a square. Introduced into England in 1813 by the Duke of Devonshire. (Latin, quadrum, a square.)

Le Pantalon. So called from the tune to which it used to be danced.

LʹÉ. From a country-dance called pas dʹété, very fashionable in 1800; which it resembles.

3

La poule. Derived from a countrydance produced by Julien in 1802, the second part of which began with the imitation of a cock-crow.

Trenise. The name of a dancing-master who, in 1800, invented the figure.

La pastourelle. So named from its melody and accompaniment, which are similar to the vilanelles or peasantsʹ dances.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Q.P
Q.S
Q.V. (Latin, quantum vis)
Quack or Quack Doctor;
Quacks
Quad
Quadra
Quadragesima Sunday
Quadragesimals
Quadrilateral
Quadrille
Quadriloge
Quadrivium
Quadroon
Quadruple Alliance of 1674
Quæstio Vexata
Quail
Quaint
Quaker
Qualm
Quandary