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Sablonnière (La)

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The sand-pits. So the Tuileries were called to the fourteenth century. Towards the end of that century tiles were made there, but the sand-pits were first called the Tile-works or Tuileries in 1416. At the beginning of the sixteenth century. Nicolas de Neuville built a house in the vicinity, which he called the “Hôtel des Tuileries.” This property was purchased in 1518 by François I. for his mother.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Sabbath of Sound (The)
Sabbathians
Sabbatical Year
Sabeans
Sabeanism
Sabeism
Sabellians
Sabiens
Sable
Sable black
Sablonnière (La)
Sabra
Sabreur
Sabrina (Latin)
Saccharine Principle in Things (The)
Saccharissa
Sacco Benedetto or Saco Bendito [the blessed sack or cloak]
Sachem
Sachentege
Sack
Sack