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Tabʹard

.

The Tabard, in Southwark, is where Chaucer supposes his pilgrims to have assembled. The tabard was a jacket without sleeves, whole before, open on both sides, with a square collar, winged at the shoulder like a cape, and worn by military nobles over their armour. It was generally emblazoned with heraldic devices. Heralds still wear a tabard.

“Item … a chascun ung grand tabart

De cordelier, jusques aux pieds.”

Le Petit Testament de Maistre Francois Villon.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Syrtis
T
T.Y.C.
T-Rule (A)
Tab
Tabard
Tabardar
Tabarin
Tabby
Tabla Rasa (Latin)
Table
Table dHôte [the host’s table]
Table Money
Table-Turning
Tableaux Vivants (French, living pictures)
Tabooed

See Also:

Tabard