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Truepenny

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Hamlet says to the Ghost, “Art thou there, Truepenny?” Then to his comrades, “You hear this fellow in the cellarage?” (i. 5). And again, “Well said, old mole; canst work?” Truepenny means earth-borer or mole (Greek, trupanon, trupao, to bore or perforate), an excellent word to apply to a ghost “boring through the cellarage” to get to the place of purgatory before cock-crow. Miners use the word for a run of metal or metallic earth, which indicates the presence and direction of a lode.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Troy-Novant (London)
Troy-town
Troy Weight
Truce of God
Truces
Truchuela
True Blue
True-lovers Knot
True as Touch
True Thomas and the Queen of Elfiand
Truepenny
Trulli
Trump
Trump Card
Trumpet
Trumpeter
Trumpets (Feast of)
Trundle
Truss his Points (To)
Trusts
Truth