Hall, George

, son of the preceding, was born at Waltham Holy Cross in 1612, while his father was rector there, and was admitted commoner of Exeter college, Oxford, in 1628. After taking his degrees and obtaining a fellowship, he was in 1639 collated to a prebend of Exeter. In 1641 he was made archdeacon of Cornwall on the resignation of his brother Robert, and had also the rectory of Minhinnet in that county, but was sequestered by the usurping powers, and although he would have kept a school for his subsistence, was not suffered even that resource. On the restoration, he was first made canon of Windsor, and afterwards bishop of Chester, with which he held Wigan in Lancashire, a living that was for several turns presented to the bishops of Chester. His death, on Aug. 23, 1668, was occasioned by a wound received by a knife, which happened to be in his pocket, when he fell from the mount in his garden at Wigan. He published some sermons, and a treatise entitled “The Triumphs of Rome over despised Protestancy,” Lond. 1655. He was a considerable benefactor to Exeter college. 2


Ath. Ox. vol. II Birch’s Life of Tillotson.