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Brutality

,—thief-takers; the keepers and turn-keys of gaols. A judge passing sentence of death against a youthful convict, not fourteen years old, for stealing five shillings. The late Earl of Lincoln, now Duke of Newcastle, prosecuting a countryman for killing a hare on his estate, and afterwards declaring, on being told the magistrates had only condemned the man to six months imprisonment in the couhty gaol, that had he known the sentence would be so mild, he would have prosecuted him in the Exchequer, when he might have been able to transport the culprit to Botany-bay. The Lord Advocate of Scotland’s speech in the English House of Commons, on the case of Muir and Palmer. The amusements of Princes and nobles; boxing, cockfighting, hunting down hares, shooting partridges, woodcocks, &c.&c. Draymen abusing their draft horses, and the Earl of Darlington, a young nobleman, possessing 50,000l. a year, riding one generous animal sixty miles in five hours, and thereby causing the horse’s death! Quere, Which be the greater brute, his lordship or the horse?

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Entry taken from A Political Dictionary, by Charles Pigott, 1795.

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Brutality
Calumny