Athens

Athens (Ath`ens) , the capital of Attica, and the chief city of ancient Greece, at once the brain and the heart of it; the resort in ancient times of all the able and wise men, particularly in the domain of literature and art, from all parts of the country and lands beyond; while the monuments of temple and statue that still adorn it give evidence of a culture among the citizens such as the inhabitants of no other city of the world have had the genius to surpass, though the name Athens has been adopted by or applied to several cities, Edinburgh in particular, that have been considered to rival it in this respect, and is the name of over twenty places in the United States. The two chief monuments of the architecture of ancient Athens, both erected on the Acropolis, are the Parthenon (q.v.), dedicated to Athena, the finest building on the finest site in the world, and the Erechtheum, a temple dedicated to Poseidon close by; is the capital (100) of modern Greece, the seat of the government, and the residence of the king.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Athenag`oras * Athlone
Athalia
Athanasian Creed
Athanasius
Atheism
Atheism, Modern
Athelney, Isle of
Athe`na
Athenæum
Athenæus
Athenag`oras
Ath`ens
Athlone
Athole
Athole-brose
Athole, Sir John James Hugh Stewart-Murray, 7th Duke of
A`thos, Mount
Atlanta
Atlantes
Atlantic, The
Atlan`tis
At`las

Nearby

Athens in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Abbot, George [No. 3]
Abelard, Peter
Abydenus
Acciaioli, Donato
Acron
Adam, Robert
Adrian, Publius Æliuvs
Agatharcus
Agatho
Airay, Henry
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