Brontë

Brontë, the name of three ladies, Charlotte, Emily, and Anne, daughters of a Yorkshire clergyman of Irish extraction: Charlotte, born at Thornton, Yorkshire; removed with her father, at the age of four, to Haworth, a moorland parish, in the same county, where she lived most of her days; spent two years at Brussels as a pupil-teacher; on her return, in conjunction with her sisters, prepared and published a volume of poems under the pseudonyms respectively of “Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell,” which proved a failure. Nothing daunted, she set to novel writing, and her success was instant; first, “Jane Eyre,” then “Shirley,” and then “Villette,” appeared, and her fame was established. In 1854 she married her father's curate, Mr. Nicholls, but her constitution gave way, and she died (1816-1855). Emily (Ellis), two years younger, poet rather than novelist; wrote “Wuthering Heights,” a remarkable production, showing still greater genius, which she did not live to develop. Anne (Acton), four years younger, also wrote two novels, but very ephemeral productions.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Bronte * Bronze Age
Bromberg
Brome, Alexander
Brome, Richard
Bromine
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Bröndsted, Peter Olaf
Brongniart, Adolphe
Brongniart, Alexandre
Bronte
Brontë
Bronze Age
Bronzi`no
Brook Farm
Brooke, Henry
Brooke, Sir James
Brooke, Stopford
Brooklyn
Brooks, Charles William Shirley
Brosses, Charles de
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