Cæsar, Caius Julius (b. 100 B.C.)

Cæsar, Caius Julius, pronounced the greatest man of antiquity, by birth and marriage connected with the democratic party; early provoked the jealousy of Sulla, then dictator, and was by an edict of proscription against him obliged to quit the city; on the death of Sulla returned to Rome; was elected to one civic office after another, and finally to the consulship. United with Pompey and Crassus in the First Triumvirate (60 B.C.); was appointed to the government of Gaul, which he subdued after nine years to the dominion of Rome; his successes awoke the jealousy of Pompey, who had gone over to the aristocratic side, and he was recalled; this roused Cæsar, and crossing the Rubicon with his victorious troops, he soon saw all Italy lying at his feet (49 B.C.); pursued Pompey, who had fled to Greece, and defeated him at Pharsalia (48 B.C.); was thereupon elected dictator and consul for five years, distinguishing himself in Egypt and elsewhere; returned to Rome (47 B.C.); conceived and executed vast schemes for the benefit of the city, and became the idol of its citizens; when he was assassinated on the Ides (the 15th) of March, 44 B.C., in the fifty-sixth year of his age; (b. 100 B.C.)

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Cæsar * Cæsarea
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Cad`mus
Cadoudal, Georges
Caduceus
Cædmon
Caen
Caer`leon
Cæsalpinus
Cæsar
Cæsar, Caius Julius
Cæsarea
Cagliari
Cagliari, Paolo
Cagliostro, Count Alessandro di
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Cagots
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Caiaphas
Caiapos
Caicos

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Caesar, Julius