Celts

Celts. The W. of Europe was in prehistoric times subjected to two invasions of Aryan tribes, all of whom are now referred to as Celts. The earlier invaders were Goidels or Gaels; they conquered the Ivernian and Iberian peoples of ancient Gaul, Britain, and Ireland; their successors, the Brythons or Britons pouring from the E., drove them to the westernmost borders of these countries, and there compelled them to make common cause with the surviving Iberians in resistance; in the eastern parts of the conquered territories they formed the bulk of the population, in the W. they were in a dominant minority; study of languages in the British Isles leads to the conclusion that the Irish, Manx, and Scottish Celts belonged chiefly to the earlier immigration, while the Welsh and Cornish represent the latter; the true Celtic type is tall, red or fair, and blue-eyed, while the short, swarthy type, so long considered Celtic, is now held to represent the original Iberian races.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Celtibe`ri * Cenci, The
Celebes
Céleste, Mme.
Celestial Empire
Celestine
Celestines
Cellini, Benvenuto
Celsius
Celsus
Celsus
Celtibe`ri
Celts
Cenci, The
Cenis, Mont
Censors
Cen`taurs
Central America
Central India
Central Provinces
Ceos
Cephalonia
Cephalus

Nearby

Celts in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Schoepflin, John Daniel
Stukeley, William