Chicago

Chicago, the metropolis of Illinois, in the NE. of the State, on the SW. shore of Lake Michigan, is the second city in the Union; its unparalleled growth, dating only from 1837—in 1832 a mere log-fort, and now covering an area of 180 sq. m., being 21 m. in length and 10 m. in breadth—is due to its matchless facilities for communication. Situated in the heart of the continent, a third of the United States railway system centres in it, and it communicates with all Canada, and with the ocean by the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River; laid out with absolute regularity, it has many magnificent buildings, enormously tall office “sky-scrapers,” and an unrivalled system of parks and avenues; there are a university, medical, commercial, and theological colleges, an art institute, libraries, and observatory; it suffered severely from fire in 1871 and 1874; it is the greatest grain and pork market in the world, and its manufactures include almost every variety of production; the population is a mixture of all European peoples; native-born Americans are a small minority, outnumbered by the Germans and almost equalled by the Irish.

Population (circa 1900) given as 1,700,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Chica * Chicard
Cheyenne Indians
Cheyne, George
Cheyne, Thomas Kelly
Chézy, De
Chiabrera, Gabriello
Chia`na
Chiapas, Las
Chiaroscuro
Chibchas
Chica
Chicago
Chicard
Chicheley, Henry
Chichester
Chichevache
Chickasaws
Chiclana
Chief
Chiem-see
Chien de Jean de Nivelle
Chië`ti