Doré, Gustave (18321883)

Doré, Gustave, a French painter and designer, born in Strasburg; evinced great power and fertility of invention, having, it is alleged, produced more than 50,000 designs; had a wonderful faculty for seizing likenesses, and would draw from memory groups of faces he had seen only once; among the books he illustrated are the “Contes Drolatiques” of Balzac, the works of Rabelais and Montaigne, Dante's “Inferno,” also his “Purgatorio” and “Paradiso,” “Don Quixote,” Tennyson's “Idylls,” Milton's works, and Coleridge's “Ancient Mariner”; among his paintings were “Christ Leaving the Prætorium,” and “Christ's Entry into Jerusalem”; he has left behind him works of sculpture as well as drawings and pictures; his art has been severely handled by the critics, and most of all by Ruskin, who treats it with unmitigated scorn (18321883).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Dordogne * Doria, Andrea
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Doré, Gustave
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