Epitaph

Epitaph, an inscription placed on a tombstone in commemoration of the dead interred below. The natural feeling which prompts such inscriptions has manifested itself among all civilised peoples, and not a little of a nation's character may be read in them. The Greeks reserved epitaphs for their heroes, but amongst the Romans grew up the modern custom of marking the tombs of relatives with some simple inscription, many of their sepulchres being placed on the side of the public roads, a circumstance which explains the phrase, Siste, viator—Stay, traveller—found in old graveyards.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Epistolæ Obscurorum Virorum * Epithalamium
Epimenides
Epimetheus
Epinal
Epinay, Madame d'
Epiphanius, St.
Epiphany
Epi`rus
Episcopacy
Episcopius, Simon
Epistolæ Obscurorum Virorum
Epitaph
Epithalamium
Epping Forest
Epsom
Equinoctial Points
Equinoxes
Equites, The
Erasmus, Desiderius
Erastianism
Erastus
Erato

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Balguy, Thomas
Carew, Thomas
Cary, Henry
Cowper, William [1666–1709]
Crashaw, Richard
Delfau, Francis
Duncombe, John
Morley, Dr. George
Ralegh, Sir Walter
Reed, Joseph