Ethiopia

Ethiopia, a term loosely used in ancient times to indicate the territory inhabited by black or dark-coloured people; latterly applied to an undefined tract of land stretching S. of Egypt to the Gulf of Aden, which constituted the kingdom of the Ethiopians, a people of Semitic origin and speaking a Semitic language called Ge'ez, who were successively conquered by the Egyptians, Persians, and Romans; are known in the Bible; their first king is supposed to have been Menilehek, son of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba; their literature consists mostly of translations and collections of saws and riddles; the language is no longer spoken.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Ethics of Dust, The * Ethnology
Eternities, The Conflux of
Ethelbert
Etheldreda
Ethelred I.
Ethelred II.
Ether
Ether
Etheredge, Sir George
Ethics
Ethics of Dust, The
Ethiopia
Ethnology
Étienne, St.
Etive
Etna
Eton
Être Suprême
Etruria
Ettmüller, Ernst Moritz Ludwig
Ettrick
Ettrick Shepherd

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Alvares, Francis
Ambrogio, Theseus
Castell, Edmund
Democritus
Despeisses, Anthony
Frumentius, St.
Geddes, Michael
Hottinger, John-Henry
Johnson, Samuel [1709–1737]
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