Euripides (480406 B.C.)

Euripides, a famous Greek tragic dramatist, born at Salamis, of wealthy parents; first trained as an athlete, and then devoted himself to painting, and eventually to poetry; he brought out his first play at the age of 25, and is reported to have written 80 plays, of which only 18 are extant, besides fragment of others; of these plays the “Alcestes,” “Bacchæ,” “Iphigenia at Aulis,” “Electra,” and “Medeamay be mentioned; he won the tragic prize five times; tinged with pessimism, he is nevertheless less severe than his great predecessors Sophocles and Æschylus, surpassing them in tenderness and artistic expression, but falling short of them in strength and loftiness of dramatic conception; Sophocles, it is said, represented men as they ought to be, and Euripides as they are; he has been called the Sophist of tragic poets (480406 B.C.).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Eureka * Europa
Eunomians
Eunomius
Eupatoria
Euphemism
Euphrates
Euphrosyne
Euphuism
Eure
Eure-et-Loir
Eureka
Euripides
Europa
Europe
Eurotas
Eurus
Eurydice
Eurystheus
Eusebius Pamphili
Eustachio, Bartolommeo
Eustathius
Euterpë