Florida

Florida, “Land of Flowers,” the most southern of the American States, forms a bold peninsula on the E. side of the Gulf of Mexico, and has on its eastern shore the Atlantic; has a coast-line of 1150 m.; the chief physical feature is the amount of water surface, made up of 19 navigable rivers and lakes and ponds to the number of 1200, besides swamps and marshes; the climate is, however, equable, and for the most part healthy; fruit-growing is largely engaged in; the timber trade flourishes, also the phosphate industry, and cotton and the sugar-cane are extensively cultivated; a successful business in cigar-making has also of recent years sprung up, and there are valuable fisheries along the coast; Florida was admitted into the Union in 1845; the capital is Tallahassee.

Population (circa 1900) given as 391,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Florian, Jean Pierre de * Florio, John
Fleury, Claude, Abbé
Flinders, Matthew
Flint
Flint, Robert
Floating Islands
Flodden, Battle of
Flood, Henry
Flora
Florence
Florian, Jean Pierre de
Florida
Florio, John
Florus
Fludd, Robert
Flushing
Fluxions
Flying Dutchman
Fo
Fo-Hi
Foix, Gaston de
Foix, Gaston III. de

Nearby

Florida in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Apuleius, Lucius
Cabot, Sebastian
Catesby, Mark
Ellis, John
Garcilasso
Greenville, Sir Richard
Hakluyt, Richard
James, Sir William
Murphy, Arthur
Nicot, John
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