Gesta Romanorum

Gesta Romanorum (the exploits of the Romans), a collection of short didactic stories, not however solely Roman, written in the Latin tongue, probably towards the close of the 13th century, the authorship of which is uncertain, though it is generally recognised as of English origin; the stories are characterised by naïve simplicity, and have served as materials for many notable literary productions; thus Shakespeare owes to this work the plot of Pericles and the incidents of the caskets and the pound of flesh in the “Merchant of Venice,” Parnell his “Hermit,” Byron his “Three Black Crows,” and Longfellow his “King Robert of Sicily.”

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Gessner, Salomon * Gethsemane
Gerry, Elbridge
Gerson, John Charlier de
Gerstäcker, Friedrich
Gervase of Tilbury
Gervinus, Georg Gottfried
Geryon
Gesenius
Gesner, Konrad von
Gessler, Albrecht
Gessner, Salomon
Gesta Romanorum
Gethsemane
Gettysburg
Geyser
Gfrörer, August Friedrich
Ghâts
Ghazali, Abu Mohammed al-
Ghazipur
Ghazni
Gheel
Ghent

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Berchorius, Peter
Ringgli, Gotthard