Gospels

Gospels, the name by which the four accounts in the New Testament of the character, life, and teaching of Christ are designated; have been known since as early as the 3rd century, of which the first three are called “Synoptic,” because they are summaries of the chief events, and go over the same ground in the history, while the author of the fourth gospel follows lines of his own; the former aim mainly at mere narrative, while the object of the latter is dogmatic, as well as probably to supply deficiencies in the former; moreover, the interest of John's account centres in the person of Christ and that of the others in His gospel; the writers were severally represented as attended, Matthew by a man, Mark by a lion, Luke by an ox, and John by an eagle.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Goshen * Gosport
Gore, Charles
Görgei, Arthur
Gorgias
Gorgons
Gorham, George Cornelius
Görlitz
Gortschakoff, Michael
Gortschakoff, Prince
Goschen, George Joachim
Goshen
Gospels
Gosport
Gosse, Edmund
Gosse, Philip Henry
Gotha
Gotham
Gothamites
Gothard, St.
Gothenburg
Gothic Architecture
Gothland

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Aglionby, John
Alexander, Noel, In Latin Natalis
Aquinas, St. Thomas
Atterbury, Francis
Basinge, John
Beacon, Thomas
Beza, Theodore
Blackwall, Anthony
Bonnell, James
Boys, John
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