Habakkuk

Habakkuk, a book of the Old Testament by a Levite, whose name it bears, and who appears to have flourished in the 7th century B.C., containing a prophecy which belongs, both in substance and form, to the classic period of Hebrew literature, and is written in a style which has been described as being “for grandeur and sublimity of conception, for gorgeousness of imagery, and for melody of language, among the foremost productions of that literature.” The spirit of it is one: faith, namely, in the righteous ways of the Lord; but the burden is twofold; to denounce the judgment of God on the land for the violence and wrong that prevailed in it, as about to be executed on it by a power still more violent and unjust in its ways; and to comfort the generation of the righteous with the assurance of a time when this very rod of God's wrath shall in the pride of its power be broken in pieces, and the Lord be revealed as seated in His Holy Temple.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Haarlem * Habberton, John
Guy of Warwick
Guyon, Sir
Gwalior
Gwynn, Nell
Gyges
Gymnosophists
Gymnotus
Gypsies
Haafiz
Haarlem
Habakkuk
Habberton, John
Habeas Corpus
Habington, Thomas
Habington, William
Hachette, Jean
Hachette, Jeanne
Hackländer
Hackney
Haco V.
Haddington

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Agelius, Anthony
Costard, George
Hooker, Richard