Händel

Händel, musical composer, born at Halle; distinguished for his musical ability from his earliest years; was sent to Berlin to study when he was 14; began his musical career as a performer at Hamburg in 1703; produced his first opera in 1704; spent six years in Italy, devoting himself to his profession the while; came, on invitation, to England in 1710, where, being well received, he resolved to remain, and where, year after year—as many as nearly fifty of them—he added to his fame by his diligence as a composer; he produced a number of operas and oratorios; among the latter may be noted his “Saul,” his “Samson,” and “Judas Maccabæus,” and pre-eminently the “Messiah,” his masterpiece, and which fascinates with a charm that appeals to and is appreciated by initiated and uninitiated alike (1684-1759).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

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