Hephæstos

Hephæstos, called Vulcan by the Romans, the Greek god of fire, or of labour in the element of fire, the son of Zeus and Hera, represented as ill-shapen, lame, and ungainly, so much so as to be an object of ridicule to the rest of the pantheon, but he was indispensable to the dynasty, and to none more than his father and mother, who were often unkind to him; he had his smithy in Olympus in the vicinity of the gods, and the marvellous creations of his art were shaped on an anvil, the hammer of which was plied by 20 bellows that worked at his bidding; in later traditions he had his workshop elsewhere, and the Cyclops for his servants, employed in manufacturing thunderbolts for Zeus; he was wedded to Aphrodité, whom he caught playing false with Ares, and whom he trapped along with him in a net a spectacle to all the upper deities.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Henryson, Robert * Heptad
Henry VII.
Henry VIII.
Henry III.
Henry IV.
Henry IV.
Henry of Huntingdon
Henry the Navigator
Henry, Matthew
Henry, Patrick
Henryson, Robert
Hephæstos
Heptad
Heptarchy, Anglo-Saxon
Heptateuch
Hera
Heracles
Heracli`dæ
Heraclitus
Heraclius
Herat
Hérault

Nearby

Hephæstos in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable