Indiana

Indiana (2,192), one of the smaller but most populous States of the American Union, lies between Lake Michigan and the Ohio River, with Ohio on the E. and Illinois on the W.; the climate is marked by extremes of heat and cold; the country is somewhat hilly in the S., is mostly level, well watered, and very fertile; agriculture is the chief industry, cereals, potatoes, and tobacco forming the chief crops; there is great mineral wealth, with extensive and varied industries, embracing iron, glass, and textile manufactures, waggon-building, and furniture-making; petroleum wells are abundant, and in one part of the territory natural gas is found in great quantities. First occupied by the French, Indiana was acquired by Britain in 1763, ceded to America 1783, and admitted to the Union in 1816; education in the State university and schools is free; besides Indianapolis, the capital, the largest towns are Evansville (50), Fort Wayne (30), and Terre Haute (30).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Indian Territory * Indianapolis
Independence, The War of
Independence Day
Independents
Index Expurgatorius
India
India
Indian Civil Service
Indian Mutiny
Indian Ocean
Indian Territory
Indiana
Indianapolis
Indians, American
India-rubber, Caoutchouc
Indiction
Indium
Individualism
Indo-China
Indo-European
Indo-Germanic
Indore

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Howe, Richard
Quin, James