Inferno

Inferno, the hell of Dante, represented as included in nine circles, of which the first six, constituting the uppermost hell, are occupied by those who cannot govern themselves yet have no mind to harm any one else, of which the seventh, constituting the mid-hell, is occupied by those who cannot govern their thoughts, and of which the eighth and ninth, constituting the nether hell, are occupied by those who have wilfully done harm to other people, those in the eighth in hot blood and those in the ninth or lowest in cold blood, the former in passion and the latter without passion, far down below the freezing-point. See Ruskin's “Fors Clavigera,” more fully, and by way of authority for this.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Inferi * Inflection
Indore
Indra
Induction
Indulgence
Indus
Inertia
Inez de Castro
Infallibility
Infante, Infanta
Inferi
Inferno
Inflection
Influenza
Infralapsarians
Infusoria
Ingelow, Jean
Ingemann, Bernhard Severin
Ingleby, Clement Mansfield
Inglesant, John
Inglis, Sir James
Inglis, Sir John

Nearby

Inferno in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Boccaccio, John
Cavalcanti, Guido
Dante, Alighieri
Gelli, John Baptist
Helmont, Francis Mercurius Van
Rogers, Charles
Signorelli, Luca
Swedenborg, Emanuel