Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim (17291781)

Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim, a German author, and founder of modern German literature, born at Kamenz, Saxony, son of the pastor there; sent to study theology at Leipzig, studied hard; conceived a passion for the stage; wrote plays and did criticisms; wrote an essay on Pope; took English authors as his models, revolted against those of France; made it his aim to inaugurate or rather revive a purely German literature, and produced examples regarded as classics to this day; his principal dramas, all conceived on the soil, are “Miss Sara Sampson,” “Mina von Barnhelm,” “Emilia Galotti,” and “Nathan der Weise,” and his principal prose works are his “Fables” and “Laocoon,” a critical work on art still in high repute (17291781).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

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Lespinasse
Lesseps, Ferdinand de
Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim
L'Estrange, Sir Roger
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