Locke, John (16321704)

Locke, John, English philosopher, the father of modern materialism and empiricism, born in Wrington, Somerset; studied medicine, but did not practise it, and gave himself up to a literary life, much of it spent in the family of the celebrated Earl of Shaftesbury, both at home with it and abroad; his great work is his “Essay on the Human Understanding” in 1690, which was preceded by “Letters on Toleration,” published before the expulsion of James II., and followed by the “Treatise on Government” the same year, and “Thoughts on Education” in 1693; his “Essay” was written to show that all our ideas were derived from experience, that is, through the senses and reflection on what they reveal, and that there are no innate ideas; “Locke,” says Prof. Saintsbury, “is eminently” (that is, before all his contemporaries) “of such stuff as dreams are not made of”—is wholly a prosaic practical man and Englishman (16321704).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Lochleven * Lockhart, John Gibson
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Local Option
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Locke, John
Lockhart, John Gibson
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Logarithm