Manchuria

Manchuria, a Chinese province lying between Mongolia and Corea, with the Amur River on the N. and the Yellow Sea on the S., is five times the size of England and Wales; the northern, central, and eastern parts are mountainous; the Sungari is the largest river; the soil is fertile, producing large crops of millet, maize, hemp, &c., but the climate in winter is severe; pine forests abound; the country is rich in gold, silver, coal, and iron, but they are little wrought; beans, silk, skins and furs are exported; the imports include textiles, metals, paper, and opium; the Manchus are the aristocracy of the province; Chinese settlers are industrious and prosperous; the chief towns are Moukden (250) in the S., Kirin (75) on the Sungari, and New-Chwang (60) on the Liao River, a treaty-port since 1858; Russian influence predominates in the province since 1890.

Population (circa 1900) given as 21,000,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Manchester, Edward Montagu, Earl of * Mandæans
Man of Destiny
Man of Feeling
Man of Ross
Man of Sin
Manasseh-ben-Israel
Manby, Captain
Mancha, La
Manche, La
Manchester
Manchester, Edward Montagu, Earl of
Manchuria
Mandæans
Mandalay
Mandarin
Mandeville, Bernard de
Mandeville, Sir John
Mandingoes
Manes
Manes, Mani
Manetho
Manfred