Manitoba

Manitoba (Manito`ba) , a partially developed inland province of Canada, somewhat larger than England and Wales; is square in shape, with the United States on its S. border, Assiniboia on the W., Saskatchewan and Keewatin on the N., and Ontario on the E.; a level prairie and arable country, scantily wooded but well watered, having three large lakes, Winnipeg, Winnipegosis, and Manitoba, and three large rivers, Assiniboine, Souris, and Red River. The climate is dry and healthy, though subject to great extremes of temperature; comparatively little snow falls; the soil is very fertile; mixed farming, dairy, cattle, and sheep farming are carried on successfully. Land is cheap, and the government still makes free grants of 160-acre lots. There is no mineral wealth; coal is found in the S.; fishing is pursued on the lakes and rivers. Constituted a province in 1870, Manitoba was the scene of the Riel rebellion, quelled that same year. The government is vested in a lieutenant-governor, an executive council, and a single chamber of 40 members. In the Dominion Government the province is represented by four members of Senate and five members of the Commons. The capital is Winnipeg (26), the seat of a university and of extensive flour-mills. The other chief towns are Brandon (4), a market town, and Portage-la-Prairie (4), with a brewery, flour, and paper mills.

Population (circa 1900) given as 193,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Manin, Daniel * Manitou
Mandingoes
Manes
Manes, Mani
Manetho
Manfred
Manfred, Count
Manhattan
Manichæism
Manila
Manin, Daniel
Manito`ba
Manitou
Manlius, Capitolinus
Mann, Horace
Manna
Mannheim
Manning, Henry Edward
Mans, Le
Mansard
Mansel, Henry Longueville
Mansfield