Parthia

Parthia, an ancient country corresponding to Northern Persia; was inhabited by a people of Scythian origin, who adopted the Aryan speech and manners, and subsequently yielded much to Greek influence; after being tributary successively to Assyria, Media, Persia, Alexander the Great, and Syria, they set up an independent kingdom in 250 B.C. In two great contests with Rome they made the empire respect their prowess; between 53 and 36 B.C. they defeated Crassus in Mesopotamia, conquered Syria and Palestine, and inflicted disaster on Mark Antony in Armenia; the renewal of hostilities by Trajan in A.D. 115 brought more varied fortunes, but they extorted a tribute of 50,000,000 denarii from the Emperor Macrinus in 218. Ctesiphon was their capital; the Euphrates lay between them and Rome; they were over thrown by Ardashir of Persia in 224. The Parthians were famous horse-archers, and in retreat shot their arrows backwards often with deadly effect on a pursuing enemy.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Parthenope * Partick
Parramatta
Parrhasius
Parry, Sir William Edward
Parsees
Parsifal
Parson Adams
Parsons, Robert
Parthenogenesis
Parthenon
Parthenope
Parthia
Partick
Partington, Mrs.
Pascal, Blaise
Pas-de-Calais
Pasha
Pasiphaë
Paskievitch
Pasquino
Passau
Passing-bell

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