Phœnix

Phœnix, a bird which was fabled at the end of certain cycles of time to immolate itself in flames, and rise renewed in youth from the ashes. It has become the appropriate symbol of the death-birth that ever introduces a new era in the history of the world, and is employed by Carlyle in “Sartor” as symbol of the crisis through which the present generation is now passing, the conflagration going on appearing nowise as a mere conflagration, but the necessary preliminary of a new time, with the germinating principles of which it is pregnant.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Phœnicia * Phœnix Park
Philpotts, Henry
Philtre
Phiz
Phlegethon
Phlogiston
Phocas
Phocion
Phocis
Phœbus
Phœnicia
Phœnix
Phœnix Park
Phonograph
Photius
Photogravure
Photosphere
Phototype
Phrenology
Phrygia
Phrygian Cap
Phryné

Nearby

Phœnix in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable