Prague

Prague, capital of Bohemia, on the Moldau, 217 m. by rail NW. of Vienna, is a picturesque city with over 70 towers, a great royal palace, unfinished cathedral, an old town-hall, a picture-gallery, observatory, botanical garden, and museums; the University, partly German and partly Czech, has 300 teachers, 4000 students, and a magnificent library; the centre of an important transit trade, Prague is the chief commercial city of Bohemia; has manufactures of machinery, chemicals, leather, and textile goods; four-fifths of the population are Czechs; founded in the 12th century, it has suffered in many wars; was captured by the Hussites 1424, fell frequently during the Thirty Years' War, capitulated to Frederick the Great 1757, and in 1848 was bombarded for two days by the Austrian Government in quelling the democratic demonstrations of the Slavonic Congress of that year.

Population (circa 1900) given as 310,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Pragmatic Sanction * Prairie
Powers, Hiram
Poynings's Law
Poynter, Edward John
Pozzo di Borgo, Count
Pozzuoli
P. P., Clerk of this Parish
Praed, Winthrop Mackworth
Prætor
Prætorian Guard
Pragmatic Sanction
Prague
Prairie
Prakrit
Pratique
Praxiteles
Praying-Wheels
Pre-Adamites
Precession of the Equinoxes
Précieuses Ridicules
Predestination
Predicables

Nearby

Antique pictures of Prague

Links here from Chalmers

Achen, John Van
Adalbert [No. 3]
Albicus
Andreas, James
Arriaga, Roderic De
Bedraschi
Bender, Blaise Colomban, Baron De
Benyowsky, Count Mauritius Augustus De
Born, Ignatius
Bourdon, Sebastian
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