Prussia

Prussia (24,690), the leading State of the German Empire, occupies about two-thirds of the imperial territory, and contributes three-fifths of the population; it stretches from Holland and Belgium in the W. to Russia in the E., has Jutland and the sea on the N., and Lorraine, Bavaria, Hesse-Darmstadt, Saxony, and Austria on the S.; the SW. portion is hilly and the soil often poor, but containing valuable mineral deposits; the N. and E. belongs to the great European plain, devoted to agriculture and grazing; Hesse-Cassel is extremely fertile, and Nassau produces excellent wine; in the E. and in Hanover are extensive forests; Silesia, Westphalia, and Rhenish Prussia contain the chief coal-fields, and are consequently the chief industrial provinces; half the zinc of the world is mined in Prussia; lead, iron, copper, antimony, &c., are also wrought; the Hartz Mountains are noted for their mines; Salt, amber, and precious stones are found on the Baltic shores; textiles, metal wares, and beer are the main industries; Berlin and Elberfeld are the two chief manufacturing centres on the Continent; the great navigable rivers, Niemen, Vistula, Oder, Elbe, Weser, Rhine, and their tributaries and canals, excellent railways, and her central European position all favour Prussia's commerce, while her coast-line, harbours, and growing mercantile fleet put her in communication with the markets of the world; seven-eighths of the people are Germans; Slavonic races are represented by Poles, Wends, Lithuanians, and Czechs, while the Danes appear in Schleswig-Holstein; the prevailing religion is Protestant; education is compulsory and good; there are ten universities, and many great libraries and educational institutions; the Prussian is the largest contingent in the German army; the king of Prussia is emperor of Germany. The basis of the Prussian people was laid by German colonists placed amid the pagan Slavs whom they had conquered by the Teutonic knights of the 13th century; in 1511 their descendants chose a Hohenzollern prince; a century later the Hohenzollerns of Brandenburg succeeded; despite the Thirty Years' War Prussia became a European State, and was recognised as a kingdom in 1703; Frederick the Great (1740-1786) enlarged its bounds and developed its resources; the successive partitions of Poland added to her territory; humiliated by the peace of Tilsit 1807, and ruined by the French occupation, she recovered after Waterloo; William I. and Bismarck still further increased her territory and prestige; by the Austrian War of 1866 and the French War of 1870-71 her position as premier State in the German Confederation was assured.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Prudentius, Marcus Aurelius Clemens * Prynne, William
Protogenes
Protoplasm
Proudhon, Pierre Joseph
Prout, Samuel
Prout, Father
Provençal Language
Provence
Proverbs, Book Of
Providence
Prudentius, Marcus Aurelius Clemens
Prussia
Prynne, William
Prytane`um
Psalmanazar, George
Psalms, The Book of
Psyche
Psychical Research, Society for
Ptolemaic System
Ptolemaïs
Ptolemy
Ptolemy (Claudius Ptolemæus)

Nearby

Prussia in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

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A Lasco, John
Abel, Gaspar
Achard, Anthony
Achilles, Alexander
Adalbert [No. 3]
Adam, Lambert-Sigisbert
Adam, Nicholas-Sebastian
Adelburner, Michael
Alembert, John Le Rond D'
Ales, Alexander
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