Rabelais, François (14951553)

Rabelais, François, great French humorist, born at Chinon, the son of a poor apothecary; was sent to a convent at nine; became a Franciscan monk; read and studied a great deal, but, sick of convent life, ran away at forty years of age; went to Montpellier, and studied medicine, and for a time practised it, particularly at Lyons; here he commenced the series of writings that have immortalised his name, his “Gargantua” and “Pantagruel,” which he finished as curé of Meudon, forming a succession of satires in a vein of riotous mirth on monks, priests, pedants, and all the incarnate solecisms of the time, yet with all their licentiousness revealing a heart in love with mankind, and a passionate desire for the establishment of truth and justice among men (14951553).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Rabbism * Races of Mankind
Quit-rent
Quorra
Quorum
Qurân
Raab
Raasay
Rabant de St. Étienne
Rabat
Rabbi
Rabbism
Rabelais, François
Races of Mankind
Rachel, Eliza
Racine
Racine, Jean
Rack
Radcliffe
Radcliffe, Mrs. Ann
Radcliffe, John
Radetzky, Johann, Count von
Radicals